Category Archives: Digital History

Found: That Great Hadith Scholar, Nebuchadnezzar…

I’m currently transliterating/translating an index to persons mentioned in Yāqūt al-Ḥamawī’s famous Muʿjam al-Buldān.  It’s wonderful working with encyclopedic texts; I have had the opportunity to explore everything from Parthian (Arsacid) rulers and ancient Arab battles over horses to love poets and hadith transmitters.  But today I came across a very curious entry in the index:

البخاري (محمد بن إسماعيل بخت نصر): (1) 208، 257، 310، 376، 384، 479 (2) 91، 329، 331 (3) 272، 281، 400 (4) 78 (5) 140، 410، 453

which translates to:

al-Bukhārī (Muḥammad b. Ismāʿīl Bukht Naṣar): I: 208, 257, 310, 376, 384, 479; II: 91, 329, 331; III: 272, 281, 400; IV: 78; V: 140, 410, 453

The oddity is that “al-Bukhārī” (d. 870 CE) is perhaps the most famous transmitter of sayings ascribed to Muhammad, while “Bukht Naṣar” is the Arabic spelling of Nebuchadnezzar (6th C BCE).  What’s going on here? Continue reading

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Teaching Digital (Middle Eastern) History

Summer is over, Fall Semester has started, and I am teaching a new course entitled, “Minorities and Diversity of the Middle East.”  The class covers both ethnic and religious diversity from Muhammad to the present, so we have a lot of ground to go over.  As this is a topic of particular interest to me, I am very excited to be offering this class.  But I am excited not only due to the content, but also due to an additional experiment: I am offering a digital history extra credit project, to see if it works. Continue reading